© T. Randolph and Friends | Lawrence Media | Tolerance

TRF012 | From Tolerance to Love

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T The hot buzz word in our society today is, TOLERANCE.  We need to tolerate differences, tolerate religion, © T. Randolph and Friends | Lawrence Media | Tolerance vs Lovetolerate sexual orientation, tolerate political views, tolerate a neighbor or coworker.  So much of our energy is spent  “holding our noses” and “putting up” with others, avoiding those we feel are different.  We are taught tolerance in school, on the playground, in sports, in business, in social settings.  We have museums of tolerance, movies of tolerance, literature on tolerance, and religions of tolerance.  All of which are good and necessary for a society to live at peace, to thrive as a group and to understand our differences.

However, often we stop at the doorstep of tolerance.  We feel tolerance is simply enough.  We cannot begin to image going BEYOND tolerance.

So much of what people post on social media today are debates about who is the most tolerant group on a particular issue.  But isn’t our life supposed to be deeper than that?  Are we not asked by a gracious God to push way beyond tolerance into the place of loving and caring for others?

 

 

The Hundred Foot Journey – From Tolerance to Love

© T. Randolph and Friends | Lawrence Media | Hundred Foot JourneyIn a recent Walt Disney Studios movie based on a novel by Richard C. Morais called, The Hundred Foot Journey, we see a story unfold of human transformation.  The most polarizing characters move from a place of intolerance, then to indifference, into tolerance, traveling into acceptance and finally and ultimately, to love.

The story is about a young aspiring chef, Hassan Kadam (Manish Dayal), who with his family are displaced from their native India, to settling  in a beautiful and quaint village in the south of France.  The family decides to purchase an old dilapidated property across the road from a world famous, classical French restaurant, Le Saule Pleureur.  Much to the chagrin of  it’s proprietor, Madame Mallory (Helen Mirren), the patriarch of the family, Papa (played by actor Om Puri), decides to open an Indian Restaurant on the old gravel road juxtapose to Ms. Mallory’s French cuisine restaurant, 100 feet away.  Despite tensions and disagreements, what begins to unfold is a beautiful story of two, second generation chefs, who learn to understand, respect and embrace each others’ differences.

The Hundred Foot Journey is an amazing story about how relationships can often begin with intolerance towards people who look different, who are culturally different, or have different family systems, and end in a place of love and admiration towards others.

 

If we cannot end now our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity. For, in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future. And we are all mortal.   [Commencement Address at American University, June 10 1963]” ― John F. Kennedy

 

 

Passing Through Tolerance on the Road to Love

Today on the T. Randolph and Friends broadcast T. Randolph tackles the issue of Tolerance head on.  Tolerance is not what the God calls us to do.  God takes us © T. Randolph and Friends | Lawrence Media | Toleranceway beyond what society asks of us, and He invites us to Love our enemies.  Pray for those who despitefully use you and hate you.  T. Randolph discusses this hot topic in today’s podcast and the the call to, “Love God and Love Others.”

This is difficult to do, because it demands we enter relationship with others who are hurting, who are messy, who are difficult, and who are different.

Listen in on how T. Randolph uncovers this mystery and seeks to balance out what society says, and what the words of Christ say.

 

 

 

Love God. Love Others.

© T. Randolph and Friends | Lawrence Media | From Tolerance to Love

 

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